JERRY DAVICH: 'I’m just a 60-year-old American taking a stand' with patriotic T-shirts

Don Conrad was standing in line at Menards when the realization tapped him on the shoulder. He looked around at the other customers and noticed a similarity he never noticed before. Many of them wore T-shirts that illustrated something about their interests or values or beliefs or lifestyle.

 

Don Conrad hold blue 'Protect 2A' shirt.“This July 4th, as you watch the parade, enjoy the fireworks, and share hot dogs and beer with your friends, please remember and understand that for the most part of 15 years prior to 1776, many brave souls worked, fought and strived to be able to claim their independence and, by default, yours,” Don Conrad says.

 

One woman likes cats. One man rides a Harley. Another guy is a Notre Dame supporter. A boy is a Chicago Cubs fan. A woman drives a Mustang. Person after person. Shirt after shirt. Hint after hint.

People advertise themselves on their backs, he thought to himself. After this realization, Conrad began noticing it with people everywhere. He eventually came to a conclusion: Many people reveal who they are and often what they believe through their apparel.

Don Conrad's son, Sam, models one of the T-shirts for sale at Freedom-4-all.com, which launched in June. “By wearing Freedom-4-All apparel, you are stepping out of the shadows and uniting," the site states. "You are showing you are not alone, but are one of many, and that you will now be heard."

 

Soon after that quiet epiphany, he woke up in the middle of the night with an idea that emerged from the closet of his business-oriented mind.

He launched an online T-shirt business, Freedom-4-all.com, offering apparel with messages based on the U.S. Constitution. It’s not about politics, he said. It’s about patriotism. It’s not about red against blue. It’s about red, white and blue.

 

courthouse with American flag“I just love America but I don’t like where it’s headed. I’m fed up with what’s going on with our government and our establishment. I don’t want my kids and grandkids to inherit a country that’s been botched up in too many areas,” says Don Conrad, the father of two children.

 

                                                                              Jerry Davich, The Times

“Crazy as it might sound, maybe T-shirts can help unite our divided nation. We need to display good old-fashioned American unity on our backs,” the Valparaiso resident said.

For years, Conrad complained about the state of our nation and its uncertain future.

“I just love America, but I don’t like where it’s headed. I’m fed up with what’s going on with our government and our establishment. I don’t want my kids and grandkids to inherit a country that’s been botched up in too many areas,” the father of two children said.

“But I wasn’t doing anything about all my complaining. Not really.”

“My goal is to bring awareness, support and unity to the everyday man and woman because I believe it is time to stand up and fight for our personal freedoms before they forever slip away,” Don Conrad writes on his website.

His online apparel store is his attempt to do something about it — one T-shirt at a time, one patriotic message at a time. His website tells visitors: “We took flight because we want to bring hope and unity to people who are losing their faith in our country and those who feel abandoned.

“By wearing Freedom-4-All apparel, you are stepping out of the shadows and uniting. You are showing you are not alone, but are one of many, and that you will now be heard. And maybe, just maybe, we can make America ... America again.”

Conrad’s broader goals with this business venture: “to bring back the importance of the U.S. Constitution; truth in government and media; and honest banking and money, without a central bank digital currency.”

Don Conrad launched the online T-shirt business Freedom-4-all.com, offering apparel with messages based on the U.S. Constitution. It’s not about politics, he says, it’s about patriotism. It’s not about red against blue, it’s about red, white and blue.

 

Provided

 

"This store is our contribution to America’s Great Awakening,” Conrad told me.

This term has had multiple definitions, and distortions, throughout history, often infused with religious-political zealotry. It typically refers to several periods of old-fashioned Christian revivalism and waves of newfound enthusiasm dating to the 1700s.

“My interpretation of the Great Awakening is that … over time we have lost many of our constitutional freedoms bit by bit,” he said. “It is picking up speed, and people are waking up to that fact. I think in a couple of years this will be a pretty recognized term.